Bassweight Sessions 2: Thelem

EZ everybody.  I don’t about you lot, but this week is killing me already.  I can’t wait for Friday to be here!

To finish off the month we have a very special interview and guest mix from Matt Weare, aka Thelem.  It would be surprising if any of you hadn’t heard/seen this name on the late, the man has been climbing the ranks within the underground quite steadily.  Harnessing a multitude of platforms, ranging from a radio show on Rood.FM to operating his own label (Orientis Recordings), Thelem has been steadily spreading his sound among those involved in the deeper sound scene.  From his intricately arranged cinematic productions to his booming tribal drenched dance floor rhythms, Matt is a force to be reckoned with – a statement backed by support from some of the scenes most prolific figures, like Kryptic Minds and Youngsta.  Despite the rather massive nature of his music, Thelem keeps his head on his shoulders and his ego on lock.  With all of the controversy that has been surrounding dubstep the past couple of years, this is a characteristic that I have the utmost respect for.  People claiming one thing is or isn’t dubstep, generalizing geographic regions, hailing themselves as “the last true stepper”, it has all gotten out of control.  To see that there are still people out there who just do their thing while the madness plays out, well, it’s a breath of fresh air.  There are MANY producers out there like this, but many more clowns.

So, in the midst of Thelem’s debut release on Osiris Music, we had a chance to grab some words from this badman about his recent releases and thoughts on running a label…

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1.  Ez Matty, thank you for taking the time to give us this interview, much respect.  Just to get the formalities out of the way can you give the readers a quick background about yourself?
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Ez, my name is Matt, I’m from the UK, I produce and DJ under the alias Thelem.
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 2.  From what I’ve seen you’re a pretty humble guy, generally keeping to yourself when it comes to opinions about any topic occupying threads among dubstep listeners.  Is this something that you set out to do?  Or is this just your personality type?
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Well Generally I’m pretty mellow I guess. I have my own opinions about certain things I see online, but I’m the type of person that doesn’t get involved in arguments and online debates. I’m also not a big fan of arrogance, so I guess it’s more in my nature to be humble.  I don’t get some people who act like superstars when what we do is just underground dance music. 
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3.  You launched your record label, Orientis, early last year (if I’m not mistaken), showcasing the up and coming talents Killa & Instinct, Antics, and Subreachers, alongside your own productions.  Are there any newcomers that you plan on introducing this year?
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Well sadly I have decided to close the doors on Orientis and call it a day. Mainly due to the fact of the time and cost required for running the label. I lost alot of money in the initial stages through the fault of an old distributor, so it was hard to ever come back from that and regain the money.  I thought instead of stressing and worrying, it would be better to focus more time and energy into other things. It wasn’t all a waste of time though, it was definitely an eye-opener and good insight to how it all works.

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4.  In your Hedmuk interview last year you spoke of the importance a vinyl release has to you – hence the vinyl only release nature, but due to the changing landscape of the scene you intended on catering with more digital releases.  I know that late 2011 saw the ‘Angles’ compilation, which was purely digital, but have your thoughts changed at all about the format in which you will choose to release?  Especially given the quite consistent rise in vinyl sales the past couple/few years (depending on who you talk to) has seen?
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I still think that vinyl releases play an important role to me.  It’s nice having that physical element of the hard work that went into making those tunes. Looking back when your older it’s going to be nice seeing what you achieved through your career with that physical format.  Apart from that, I also think a label that does vinyl as well as digital will tend to stand out more, so I think its good for the interest of the label and the artist. However, in my opinion it’s not just about vinyl either, it’s important that labels release digital copies of the release as I think they would miss a large target audience in not doing so. 

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 5.  We recently saw your debut release on Black Box, Kaba/Point of No Return, which was another quality project with Killawatt.  What a release!  After Swarf, Dualism, and BLKBOX009 (among many others I’m sure) you two have carved out to be quite the team.  How did you guys become acquainted with each other?
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Like most people that I have met in music, it started from chatting online, through Facebook or AIM, etc.  Back when I first started chatting to Killawatt he was pretty local to where I lived, like 20/30 minutes away, so we decided to meet up and get on a beat.  It all went from there really and we continued to work on collab productions.
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6.  Just recently got news about your debut release on Osiris music.  Congratulations on that one bro!  That’s quite the feat considering the selective nature of the label.  What was your reaction when first receiving this news?
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I was really stoked to be honest. Osiris has been one of my favorite labels for a while so it was huge step being able to release on them. 

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7.  The detailed nature in the atmospheric elements of your music is something that really caught my attention when first introduced to your productions.  Do you have any background education in cinematic or soundscape design?
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Nah I never studied anything like that, I guess self taught through my own productions and experimenting really. I do love atmospherics though, to me they help build the character of a tune, much like they do in film I guess. I like sci-fi / darker films and atmospheric soundscapes play quite an important role in them, so maybe that’s where it all stems from.
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8.  I believe you’re part of the Rood.fm family.  I lock in as often as I can to catch the various shows.  What’s it like to host a radio show?  How large of a factor would you consider the radio show, as far as getting your music out there to be heard?
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Sadly I’m no longer part of Rood.fm, I haven’t done my show on there for quite a while.  I had done it for about a year and I felt like a change was needed, it was time to move on and let someone else take the slot.  My show was not very popular, so I guess it didn’t really play a role in getting my own tunes out there, it was still fun at the time though. 
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9.  Who shot Biggie and ‘Pac?

The Illuminati loool

10.  What should the readers be on the look out for in the future?  Shows, forthcomings, etc.?

Well I have just done a remix for Kryptic Minds, hopefully you should hear about in soon, so keep your ears to the ground for that.  As for releases I have another Osiris release lined up that should be out in the not too distant future.  Booking wise you can find me in Lincoln and London, then Killawatt and me are heading to the States for a mini USA tour that I’m really looking forward to.  Then from there it’s off to Outlook festival, that’s about it for this month. 
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Big ups in taking the time to read this, enjoy the Mix!

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That’s all for today fam’.  Hope you enjoyed the read!  Below is a mix that Thelem built to accompany this interview.  Some seriously wicked tunes inside this mix, all beautifully blended.  Make sure you stop by Thelem’s page and show him some love!

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Catch ya’ next time.

To the gods.

-Kinman

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DubApes – We Are Monkeys EP (PORK007)

Oi oi!  What’s good with the people dem’.

Back from another weekend – unfortunately.  We really to need to have at least ONE 3-day weekend every month, get your votes in.  Anyway…

Hopefully you guys remember the badman Sparxy that we did a review about back in May, with his ‘Mr. Robot’ EP (peep it here).  Well today I want to take a look at another massive EP that was just released today on his Bacon Dubs label.  The EP is called ‘We Are Apes’ and hails from the Austrian duo, DubApes.  I had absolutely no idea who these guys were prior to this release, but you can count on the fact that I have them locked in my sight from here on out.  Marking the 7th release for Bacon Dubs, this 4-track piece of music comes hard with sub-flexing pressure and just the right amount of mid-range frequencies – something fresh and welcomed.

The EP is introduced by the track ‘We Are Monkeys’.  The track is eased in with ambient pads, eastern vibed winds, and harmonic droplets, all leading to a sound byte that clearly gave rise to the tracks name.  Once the tune drops it’s a groove ridden journey through halfstep madness.  The atmospherics in this tune really complement the vibe, giving depth and mysticism to this stomper.  The second track of the EP, ‘Africa Calling’, is without a doubt my (and seemingly everyone elses) favorite tune off of the EP.  This tribal bit can really transport ones mind into a primal state.  The intro is drenched with ceremonial grunts and chants that build up to a pounding kick riddim’ back by convulsing sub-bass lines and intricately placed percussives.  I honestly have to say that this is one of my favorite tunes released thus far in 2012 – absolutely massive.  And just when you think it’s finished, the second drop throws a twist that will seduce each and every bit of your mind and body.  Jeeeeeeeeeez.  Following Africa Calling is ‘Hanuman Langures’.  This one is probably my #2 for the EP.  There’s just something about it that sets it apart from all other sounds.  The pressure behind the kicks, the eastern mysticism, the carefully placed amen breaks, it just takes form so beautifully.  The DubApes incorporate a multitude of influences flawlessly, forging ahead with a very distinct sound repertoire.  The EP’s final track is ‘Pandora’s Sorrows’.  A beautiful way to finish the release off.  This track is the epitome of uniting the frequency spectrum in a proper fashion.  Hard-hitting sub pressure sits tightly behind modulated growls and emotive wind instruments.  The subs FLEX hard on this track.  Check the clips below!

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I find it pretty much fail-safe to say that the DubApes will be on a quick rise in the ranks throughout the remainder of the year, and into the future.  Their styles are a refreshing reminder that the possibilities within the 140 arena are truly endless – the best thing about dubstep.

You can purchase the EP on Juno and Beatport so get on it and show these guys some love!  Purchase links below…

Beatport (We Are Monkeys EP)

Juno Download (We Are Monkeys EP)

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That’s all for today fam’.  Be sure to check in tomorrow as we have a very special interview and exclusive mix from another top-notch producer 🙂

To the gods.

-Kinman

HyperColour, Octane & DLR, Killawatt, & Blackwax

Big up fam’!  I feel like it’s been too long since I’ve gotten up here and thrown down some words – no esta bueno.  Regardless, I hope everybody is feeling fine and cruising through the week nice and steady.  We at Bassweight Society had quite an epic weekend.  Seven came through Santa Barbara to throw down at our monthly co-hosted with Santa Babylon and BOY did he throw down some heat.  Never have I seen Santa Barbara so amped on the deeper sounds, it was truly an amazing experience.  A club packed wall-to-wall just skanking to 4×4 tribal bassweight music is not something that our city is very accustomed to.  Gotta give one more shout to all the heads that rolled through and made the night what it was, WE LOVE YOU!    Bless up to the MC Hoodzpah and Sciphen for your support in the booth!  A massive shout is also owed to Mr. Seven for giving the people dem’ what they wanted to hear, and doing it inna’ proper fashion.  The Bassweight-Babylon connect is growing strong and hopefully we can keep this momentum going to keep bringing out these amazing artists.

Today we got a few different artists to showcase who have been tearing up the scene lately.  Bless up and enjoy the sounds 🙂

First to highlight is up-and-coming producer HyperColour.  Releasing his ‘Marvin’ EP just over a week ago with our friends at Inna Riddim Records, HyperColour is sure to be a producer that sticks around for a bit.  The EP contains three tunes, two of which stand out to me a lot.  The first one I want to mention is a track called ‘Fools Gold’.  This tune is definitely a big one for the ravers, bringing in classic 90’s style vocal samples, sirens, and quite the bouncy drum sequencing.  The shakers give it a nice jungle/breakbeat-esque atmosphere that keeps the feet moving and the big bassline keeps the soul warm.  The other tune off this EP that I wanted to point out is ‘No One Else’.  Again, HyperColour lacing your eardrums with some sexy pre-millenium house vocal cuts to set the vibes right for the dance.  The groove in this track is what really got me moving.  The intricate placement of the kick, snare, and hats respective to the walking bassline puts some love into your hips, keeping the vibes ill.  Have a listen for yourselves below…

HyperColour – Fool’s Gold (Inna Riddim Records)

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HyperColour – No One Else (Inna Riddim Records)

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This next bit is from the hand of, arguably, one of the best producers in the deep scene.  I’m sure it’s no secret to the BWS regulars that I love Killawatts music.  The man pushes boundaries, has magnificent production skills, and a work ethic that many producers can only dream of.  Tune after tune after tune, this guy.  His most recent upload to Soundcloud is a tune called ‘Foreign Accent’ and is definitely one for those with a proper sound at their dispense.  The sub-bass on this track will blow the hat right off your head.  Per standard, Matt brings crisp drums, unrivaled atmospherics, and intelligent progressions.  Would love to see a release on this one.

Killawatt – Foreign Accent

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Up next is a tune in the 170 arena from the badmen behind the moniker Octane & DLR.  These guys are some of the sickest drum and bass producers around – and if you’ve heard ‘Red Tape’ you should know they can throw down a proper 140 beat, too.  This tune is forthcoming off their album titled ‘Method In The Madness’ due out on Dispatch Recordings, which is a 17-track project due out September 3rd, 2012.  The sample today is a track titled ‘Murmur’ and features co-production by Break.  A beautifully laced vocal intro that breaks into an energy-drenched stomper.  The control that these two exhibit over the bassline is top-notch, add that to Break’s arsenal of technique and skill – BLADOWW!

Octane & DLR ft. Break – Murmur (Forthcoming Dispatch)

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The final tunes for today are favorites of mine, no doubt!  I just recently discovered these guys a week or two ago via the badman Alex Pitts who runs AJP (If ya don’ know AJP, GET TO KNOW it here).  The UK duo, Blackwax, has taken on their own front in darker-electronic music.  I have yet to hear a tune of their that I don’t like!  The tunes that I want to highlight today are a bit old so some of you have probably already heard them but if there’s anybody out there like me who hasn’t heard their sound, I want to introduce them. First track is titled ‘Surface’ and is most definitely a tune I wish I had on wax this past Friday night.  One of the skankiest beats I’ve heard in a LONG minute!  I highly recommend making room to dance wherever you decide to listen to this one!!  The second track is called ‘Offkey’ and, again, blows my mind.  The percussion variation utilized in both of these track is f*cking mental.  There’s also a free tune below called ‘Trapped Dub’.  It’s a very recent giveaway through XLR8R (here).

Blackwax – Surface (Tube 10 Records)

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Blackwax – Offkey (Tube 10 Records)

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Blackwax – Trapped Dub (FREE DOWNLOAD)

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Hope you enjoy the sounds!!  Bless up fam’.  We’ll see you next time.

To the gods.

-Kinman

Digital Mystikz @ SMOG Sunday Sessions: Recap

I am still floating off the vibes from Sunday night at Los Globos…

It is really hard to verbalize the experience that went down.  There was just SO much to take in.  My night didn’t start off the way it ended (which was in a state of bliss).  Two of my closest friends, who stupidly didn’t buy tickets before they sold-out, decided that they wanted to take the risk of POSSIBLY getting tickets at the door.  So, out of a desire for them to experience the night alongside a desire to not have to make this drive by myself, I told both of them to meet me at my house so we could take off.  We didn’t end up actually hitting the road until after 9pm, so a 1 hour drive now meant we were taking the chance of missing out on Kahn’s performance.  Sure enough, we did.  I am still quite disappointed about this as I do not know when he will be making another appearance here in California.  We pull up to the venue and see a dense line of people coming out the door – this was expected.  We look at each other and say “oh shit, that’s nuts, hopefully there’s some tickets left”.  As we begin to make a left turn around the building to find parking, we see the line extend about a half-a-block down.  I immediately knew that my friends were fucked on their ticket situation, but didn’t have the nerve to be so blunt in expressing my thoughts to them.  We found parking and began to head over to the theme-park style line that awaited us.  It was already ten minutes until 11pm, so it was here that I decided Kahn was out of the picture.  30 minutes go by and the line has moved in a infintesimal fashion.  Thoughts of missing DMZ now begin to cross my mind and the anxiety begins to build.  By this time one friend has secured a ticket from someone that was already inside and would meet him at the door.  The other friend (the one who drove us!) was still in fucked mode.  So as time began to pass we started to discuss how we were going to get home because our homie wasn’t going to stay if he didn’t get a ticket in tonight.  I start calling around and texting friends inside to see if anybody has room for us on the way home.  Out of nowhere an old friend of ours approaches us with a smile on his face and begins to chat.  We immediately tell him that we still need one ticket, because we are getting closer to the door and hear the bouncers repeating “if you don’t have a ticket, don’t waste my time, you’re not getting in.”  Out of pure coincidence and luck this guy a single extra ticket!  I honestly couldn’t even believe my ears when he told us.  The degree of relief apparent on my homies face was priceless.  I’m sorry if this story bored some of you, but I felt it quite appropriate to set the tone of how mystical the vibes were, and how aligned the energy’s seemed to be on this night.

I look at my watch and it’s 5 minutes til 12 – DMZ takes the stage in five minutes.  I’m freaking out.  The line starts to move extremely quickly as the bouncers funnel people inside.  I walk in and as I’m walking into the main room “Return II Space” is dropped, pulled back, and dropped again.  Goosebumps overtake my body.  The system is warmed up and tuned for people to really FEEL the music.   The F1’s were hitting so hard the needle jumped (at least towards the beginning of the set), but the crowd understood that this is how dubplate culture worked – especially with music emitting frequencies in the 30-50 hertz range!  Not one person looked disappointed.  If the record skipped, a simple rewind from the selectors set the mood back right.  Shortly after arrival I am in a trance-like state and end up leaving my friends to go stand in the apex of the sound field.  As I begin to look around I take in the surroundings for the first time.  The dim lighting, the way people are packed in like a sardine can, and the way the sound fills the air with sub-frequencies all act as a fuel for my trance, and I begin to drift further and further away.  My friends find me and I vaguely remember them trying to talk to me or tell me that they were going to go meet up with some other friends and I should come.  I couldn’t take my eyes off the stage, though.  Mala dropped his first few, then Coki stepped up to the decks and lets people know he’s not fucking around with ‘Gangsta For Life’.  ‘Tree Trunk’ comes in next and the place goes absolutely bananas, and the children start to mosh.  I usually detest the kids that do this type of thing at the dubstep/dnb shows that I attend, but tonight it didn’t even phase me – I couldn’t have cared less about it.    Stage packed with all the Smog fam, floor packed with heads that came out of the woodworks for this ONE show.  It was honestly so inspiring to see people in such a state of deep appreciation and respect.  Coki finishes his first go on the decks w/ Celestial Dub and I’m blown away by how hard it hits on the system.

I don’t want to go through every moment of the night because that would just end up being an excessively long script.  The entire 2 hours and 45 minutes of the Digital Mystikz set was like the above description.  This was a night that exceeded the boundaries of performance and hype.  Regardless of sex, gender, race, age, hometown, etc., people were unified in a plane of consciousness.  We were brought together to celebrate the beauty and power of soundsystem music made to elevate the mind.  I am so thankful that I was able to experience this night.

Massive shout to Drew Best, the SMOG family, DMZ, and all others involved in this event.  It was one that Los Angeles will never forget – trust!

To the gods.

-Kinman

Back To Your Roots: Foundation Sound UK

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EZ fam’.  Hope all is well, as always.
 
I’ve got a super duper special feature lined up for today.  I thought that it would be really dope to showcase styles that go back to the roots of most of the music that you find here on this website.  I think it’s safe to say that dub-reggae has had a pretty prominent role in the formation of dubstep.  The ‘soundsystem culture’ today as we know it can be greatly attributed to the dub-reggae movement.  So, in light of that, I have reached out to a crew that has been building sound system’s and pushing reggae/dub-reggae music since days that precede my birth.
  
Foundation Sound has been up and running in Norwich, UK since 1981.  Talk about some deep roots!  It’s been over 30 years and these guys are still pushing the music, message, and culture that they love.  Just as in any genre of music, landscapes have changed, technology has evolved, and the music, too.  Productions have become digital-based, although the analog kings still exist with a very respectable presence. I was thankful enough to get in touch with Ed King from Foundation Sound earlier this year when he reached out to me for promotion of the ‘My Burdens’ EP, which featured the ever so heavy remix by TMSV.  After I did some research on what the label/sound has been doing for the past 30 years and chatting with Ed a bit, I came to the conclusion that it would be really cool to feature some sounds inna’ proper roots fashion.  I don’t want to say much more because I want Ed to give some light into the crew and sound that he represents with us here today.  At the end of the feature you will find a mix done by Ed featuring Foundation Sound artists as well as others.  This is a mix that is 100% vibes throughout its entirety.  I hope everybody has their spliffs lit, or whatever you do to get into a meditation mind state, before you press play.  Makes me realize that I have not had enough dub in my life lately.  A message of love and positivity, no doubt!  Catch what Ed has to say below…
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BWS:  Big up Ed!  Thanks for supporting us with this interview.  Now, for our readers that don’t know who you are and what Foundation Sound is, can you please give them some background information on yourself and the soundsystem?

Yes greets, full respect and thanks for the support.  Foundation Sound is a reggae and dub sound system and record label based in Norwich, UK.  The sound system was originally set up in 1981 by Tony Roots (of the Liberators band, Norfolk) when he returned from time in Jamaica, and after touring as a DJ with Joseph Hill and the band Culture.  It was Joseph who named the sound system.  Basically, Foundation is a vehicle to help promote and spread the positive message of Rasta Reggae music.  Since the early years the crew has evolved and our works now include the record label, which runs alongside the sound system.

BWS:  Now, to my knowledge (and please correct me if I’m wrong), right around the mid 1980’s, England became one of the, if not THE main home of dub music.  Are there any memories or events during that time that still standout to you today?

Well it was really the late 70’s and early 80’s that reggae exploded in the UK. I think and I was only about 3 or 4 then so my experiences within the music are much more recent really.  From what Tony Roots and other (more veteran) friends tell me of them days is it was like the Jungle/early D&B scene here in the early nineties.  Reggae was THE music.  Sound systems from every corner of every city across the UK, big dances all over, and record shops constantly packed out with people wanting the latest music.  

I suppose a lot of people understandably link UK dub artists like Mad Professor and the early On-U sound stuff to being instrumental to the development of dub music but really no one but King Tubby can take the crown when it comes to being the originator and thus I think Jamaica, although not now, will always be the original home of dub.

BWS:  Foundation Sound has been around since 1980, that’s some experience under your belt!  Respect for that.  How would you say things have evolved or changed over the past 30 years?

Well back in the 80’s Foundation was really more a support sound for big acts playing gigs around the UK and Europe.  We wasn’t a sound that would clash (played against other sound systems),  Foundation would play warm up selections before the acts came on.  Highlights from them times would be supporting and warming up for acts like Eek-A-Mouse, The Wailers, Culture and Ini Kamozie.  In the 90’s, after some quieter years for the sound, me and a few other guys linked up with Foundation.  We rebuilt the sound in custom UK style; home built boxes, custom built amps and controls, and from there kinda relaunched Foundation.  Nowadays, as well as playing sessions where we string the set up and play all night we also clash against other sounds.

Foundation Sound – Happens Every Day EP (Promo Mix)

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BWS:  I have heard some people say that dub music died with King Tubby back in 89′, giving birth to the “raggamuffin” era.  Do you have any opinions on the subject?  Regardless, the day that Tubby was shot was an extremely sad day for music.

To me Tubby was the dubwise originator, the original dub organiser.  I don’t know and don’t really think that was specifically instrumental in the birth of the slacker dancehall/raggamuffin era, music changes and evolves, Jamaican music especially.  I think the music was always going to change much like society itself.  I often think that music kind of mirrors what is happening in society at certain times, reggae music especially as it has always been a peoples music, a message music. 

BWS:  Who were your main influences growing up, musically?  When and how did you get into making soundsystems
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I kinda got into Reggae music via the UK Jungle era, I always especially loved the tunes with the reggae samples and sound fx in….  My mate Guv used to get his family in London to record the Kiss FM (it was a london only station then) Jungle show for us and then send it up on cassette to us.  Sometimes on the end of the cassette tape it would run into the Manasseh show.  We started to enjoy the vibes on there and along with his show we started checking Rodigan’s shows as well.  I met Tony Roots around ’96 when we used Foundation as our PA system for Jungle parties we were doing.  He started to play me the original tunes where all the samples in the Jungle came from….  From there I started getting more and more into Reggae and dub.  The dub I could especially identfy with, to me at the time it seemed like slower more interesting Jungle.  
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I really got into the proper UK reggae scene when I moved to live in London around ’98 with my mate Barn.  I became friends with Marcus and Olston from Conqueror Sound, Willesden.  They introduced me to the whole DIY custom culture of building a sound system, checking producers for unreleased music and cutting dubplates.  I am not a Rasta but they took me in and treated me as part of their family.  I learnt a lot from them, the runnins and responsibilities of running a sound system, the culture of playing sound system and clashing others sounds.  I’ll always be grateful to them, cos’ without them and Tony Roots I would not be doing what we are doing now.
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Anyway I’m wandering off topic… those guys along with Tim from Rebel Lion sound here in Norwich are really my main influences in terms of getting into the music and sound system thing…  In terms of musical influences, I would have to say the main people would be King Tubby and in the more modern era Manasseh.  King Tubby, as I said before, is the original dub master and I don’t think anyone can argue that Baby I Love you So, King Tubby meets The Rockers Uptown, has to be one of the, if not THE, greatest ever dub tracks.  When I heard that I all I wanted to do was to make and play music like it, top-a-top.
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BWS:  What sets the Foundation soundsystem aside from any other dub soundsystem?
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Well to be honest I don’t really like comparing our sound to others, I’ll leave people to decide what sets us apart from other sounds… We concentrate on our own things, don’t watch no one else, we aren’t trying to be like anyone, we just play and do our thing as we do, you know?
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BWS:  From what I can tell, this most recent release on Foundation Sound (My Burdens) marks the first dubstep release to be included on a release from the label with TMSV’s interpretation of ‘Lay Down My Burdens’.  Can we expect more dubstep remixes on future releases?
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Yehman more remixes planned, not for awhile though probably.  The whole idea about the 12″ with reggae versions on one side and remixes on the other came from Dirty Specs.  They gave me the remix they had done and then said that TMSV had done one as well.  Me and Sam, who is the main producer for Foundation productions (and one part of the Dirty Specs team), chatted about putting out a 12″ with the remixes, kinda trying something different from our usual reggae only works.  We decided to keep the 10″ inch and 7″ inch vinyl releases reggae only and any 12″ inch releases will feature a reggae A side and then remixes on the filp, AA side style.  We got a few other guys lined up for possible collabs in the future.  The next remix release I am hoping to do will feature Richie Phoe from Brighton, really love his stuff. 
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BWS:  Each release on Foundation Sound has the “Foundation Sound Dub” version on it.  Who is behind these productions?
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As I mentioned my mate Sam is the main man behind our productions, I co-produce and manage the label.  All our releases to date have been produced by Sam, he will build a riddim then we’ll discuss ideas on what it needs.  We’ll usually get it voiced by whichever singers we are working with at the time, maybe get some live instruments on it and then that helps dictate how the tune will end up stylistically.  Once the riddims are fully built we then take it to who ever we are getting to mix it, guys like Nick Manasseh or Dougie Conscious. 
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BWS:  Now, this is definitely a “pet peeve” of mine so it would be great to hear your thoughts on the matter, considering your rooted involvement in dub music.  On the late, many new (hesitant to say uneducated) listeners refer to dubstep as dub music.  Is this something that you’ve heard before?  Any thoughts on that?
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I must admit I don’t know a lot about the dubstep scene but it doesn’t surprise me if thats the case, to me dub music is and always will be mixed up, instrumental reggae, to me dub is all about the mix.  I guess in some ways new music like dubstep is modern day dub music but to be honest words and phrases are always going to be robbed from one scene or style to describe another, like street slang really, and I can’t keep up with it so I ain’t gonna try. 
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BWS:  Will Foundation Sound be in attendance at Outlook Festival this year?  There are some really great performers lined up for this year!
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Nah we aint made it onto that line up yet, maybe in the future some time but not this time around.  We busy over the summer with a few festivals and sessions across the UK and then we should have a few things in France later in the year as well. 
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BWS:  Is there any news about forthcoming releases that the readers should keep their eyes and ears out for?
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We always got works in the pot, bubbling over…  My Burdens was originally voiced and produced over six years ago but it was only really when Sam revisited it last year with fresh ears, making a few adjustments to the riddim that we thought it was a goer, and decided to put it out.  We kinda work that way, always working on stuff, getting stuff voiced/remixed, but never really with an exact idea about what is going to be the next release. If you ask me right now whats coming next all I could say is that there is probably 2 or 3 tunes that could be the next release but we won’t know until we know, if that makes sense… Usually there is a point when we change something or get a live instrument or vocal on there, or something, and suddenly the tune is almost at the point of being ready.  At that point we kinda concentrate on that tune then till it done and ready for release.
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BWS:  Again, much respect for your time and support in this interview Ed.  Respect out to you and all of the crew at Foundation Sound.
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Yes Tyler, give thanks for the support mate and full respects to you and the Bassweight fam, keep up the works. Peace
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Make sure to familiarize yourself with the Foundation Sound crew and the music they push!  Here you will find the mixtape that Ed has put together for you listeners
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I didn’t realize that mixcloud was unable to embed with wordpress (or I just can’t find out how to do so) so just follow the url to the mixcloud page and hold your spliffs in the air, with your subs turned up!
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You can catch Foundation showcasing their latest music on Future Radio every second Wednesday of the month from 8-10pm GMT.  Holding it down for the Unity Sounds segment.  Radio link is here.  Don’t forget to stop by the Foundation Sound pages, too!
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Catch you on the flip.
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To the gods.
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-Kinman