Introducing: Uprise Audio

EZ fam’.  It’s going to be an intense couple of weeks coming up for the soundsystem culture.  We got Outlook Festival and immediately following, Dimensions Festival.  Both of these festivals have become pinnacle events for various lovers of bass.  Catered to Dub heads, House heads, Drum and Bass heads, Dubstep heads, whatever heads.  For those of you lucky enough to experience these events, my hat is off to you.  Despite being accommodated to do coverage for the US, I was unable to afford the flights out there – which has been killing me.  Next year though, 100% BWS will be there with T-shirts, stickers, and the whole nine yards :).  Can’t wait to hear about everybody’s experience (even though it will further my feelings of jealousy lol)!

Today I want to shed some light on a brand new label that will be in full-force early October.  If you use Facebook I’m sure you have seen the promotions being blasted around, but if not, this should be some quite exciting news.  This is something that BWS has been holding back for a couple months now to announce, and it makes me very proud to finally do so.  Badman Eddy Woo, aka Seven, has teamed up with Subculture Artists main woman behind the scenes Verity to launch Uprise Audio.  I shouldn’t have to give an introduction for Seven because the man has been a don to the scene for over a decade, whether it be his early drum and bass or more recent dubstep productions.  Verity is woman who has a work ethic that most can only aspire to.  Between her involvement with Subculture Artists and ICU Audio, working a studio, and NOW Uprise Audio, I often find myself wondering how the f*ck she does all this when there is only 24 hours in a day.  I mean, seriously though?

The imprints debut release is set for early October and coming from the hands of USA’a very own (although he now lives in Berlin), Dubtek.  With previous releases on labels like Paradise Lost, Requiem Audio, and Shift Recordings (to name a few), Dubtek has been steadily climbing the ranks among deep heads worldwide.  His debut release for Uprise Audio will without a doubt turn any heads that’ve slept on his productions.  The A side, ‘Extension’, is a massive track that will leave you slumped in your seat from the drum grooves and massive amounts of bass pressure.  ‘Plus Ultra’ (B side) is my personal favorite off this release.  This one just bounces and bounces,  non-stop.  The detail of this production caught my ears first time around and each time I listen to it I find something else.

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If you live in the UK, Uprise will be throwing a release party on October 4th in Nottingham at Stealth Nightclub.  The event will FREE ENTRY and have performances by Dubtek, Nanobyte, Chewie, Andrew V.C. (Vicious Circle), Seven, and Truth.  Holding down the microphone will be the infamous Toast, alongside Alys Be and Yayne.  Definitely going to want to get in on this event.  Not very often to you get that kind of quality lineup with no entrance fee!  Check the event page here.

This is definitely an imprint that you’ll want to keep your ears out for as they will be putting out some absolutely amazing music (I’ve been lucky enough to hear previews 😉 ) !!!

I will catch you next time fam’.

To the gods.

-Kinman

Weekly Selections: Seven, Lurka, Mella Dee

Big tings ladies and gents.  Happy to be checking in today, and selecting some biggies to hit the soundwaves for you.

First on deck we got Seven with a large release forthcoming.  Black Box is set to release his album Evolution, a 13 track journey through all of his newest soundscapes, in the near future.  He upped a teaser onto his Soundcloud to get us psyched for the release.  The tune titled ‘Morning Light’ featuring vocals by Alys B has a wicked atmospheric vocal intro that transitions into a heavy rock and roll type riddim.  Large party rocker no doubt.

Seven featuring Alys B – Morning Light – Evolution LP Black Box Records

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Next I wanted to highlight my favorite record release of the week.  Dropping on Black Box sister label Box Clever, Lurka hits the buttons on this one extra deep.  With a large chubby wob intersected by sections of salt shaking snares, this one will really test your shoulder lean capabilities.  High grade tunnidge and lower level lurking results in a tune we absolutely big up.

Lurka – Forgotten Ones

Be sure to scope the record here:  Lurka – Forgotten Ones / Refresher

Keeping on the same vibe, I want to highlight a track set to release on stateside record label Slit Jockey Records.  The tune by a fella named Mella Dee is titled ‘Don’t Be Neesh’.  With the skipping snare pattern and rolling bass this one makes you rock about in your seat.  With support by the likes of Starkey, we’ll be sure to hear this one in circulation once it’s released on May 14th.

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I’ll set you off for the day/night with some rasta riddims.  The next tune is one of high praise.  No major weight in this, but the vibe is right and I wanted to send you out on the right foot.  This one is sick and the words have serious blessing capabilities.  Enjoy!

Proud To Be Rasta

I’m happy I could provide you with a little break in your day.  Be sure to check this space tomorrow as we’ll have some tunes to send you into the weekend with a proper vibe!

Bless.

-Lowkey

Exclusive Interview: TMSV

Blessings, friends.  Welcome back.  We have a truly amazing feature today with, in my opinion, one of the greatest producers in the circuit right now.  Tomas Roels, aka TMSV, has been kind enough to give us a few words about his influences, his plans for 2012, and some thoughts on the US dubstep scene.  It is really an honor to have the opportunity to work with this guy as I’ve been a huge fan ever since I first heard his sounds on Box Clever in 2010.  Being creative as a youth with things such as painting and drawing acted as a catalyst into Roels’ adoption of music production.  The idea of “creating something out of nothing”, as he put it in his interview with FatKidOnFire/MakeItGood back in August of 2011 (Check it here). It wasn’t until he was around the age of 15 that he began the journey of forming his own ‘sound’.  While things didn’t necessarily take off in the beginning, as soon as he was introduced to jungle and drum and bass, things began to come together.  After gaining the satisfaction of creating his own music, “something from nothing”, his passion and dedication exploded.  After becoming bored with producing “hard and repetitive” dnb, he was introduced to dubstep by his cousin.  He was hooked on the space and endless amount of possibilities that the space provided for his compositional creativity.  The rest is history.

Fast-forward to 2012 and TMSV is receiving support from Mala, Youngsta, DJ Thinking, DJ Madd, J:Kenzo, and the list could go on for days.  It’s no surprise that this is the case with the sound versatility that he brings to the table.  There are purely meditative tracks like ‘Myth’, hard-hitting rollers like his recent collaboration ‘Difference’, and dub influenced jams such as his latest remix of “Lay Down My Burden’ which is set to release sometime soon on the label Foundation Sound.  Whatever the style is, he seems to be able to hit the nail on the head.  Since 2010 he has earned himself a number of top-notch releases on labels like Tube10, although the majority of his signings are by Black Box/Box Clever.  Releasing music almost exclusively with Black Box/Box Clever, label owner Thinking has got to be a pretty happy man!  2012 proves to be a very successful year for Tomas as he gives us news of many upcoming collaborations and new sounds to be conquered, so be sure that you keep your ears on this guy!  So, without any further introduction, let’s see what this true badman has to say:

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BWS: Quickly, can you give the readers a little back round information about yourself?  

TMSV: My name is Tomas, 23 years old and I’m from the Netherlands. I’ve been making electronic music for a couple of years, mainly dubstep.

BWS: Where did the moniker TMSV originate?

TMSV: When I first started making music I was really into jungle. One night a friend and I were joking around and he called me Tomassive (or at least that’s what I remember), so I just started to use that as a production alias. After a while I thought it was a bit gimmicky, so I changed it to TMSV. I guess it doesn’t mean anything anymore, but I urge people to have fun imagining what the letters could possibly stand for.

BWS: In your interview with Kmag last year, you stated that you think very highly of Mala because of his carelessness towards the expectations of others and money.  It’s really great to hear things like that.  What do you take away from your own music?  By that I mean what sorts of fulfillment do you get from it, psychologically or spiritually?

TMSV: Well, I’m not a spiritual person, but I guess I am emotional. I tend to use music as an outlet. I always feel the need to make music to express myself in a way. I’m not sure if the tunes themselves describe my emotions directly, but the way I feel definitely determines the way my tunes sound.

What I take away from my own music is more of a psychological fulfillment, as you put it. The fact that I can make the music I want to make, and the fact that people really seem to like it, is fantastic.

It’s been a bit tricky for a while. The more people liked and played my tunes, the more I felt pressured to make tunes that sound a certain way. I’ve made some pretty generic tunes recently (that probably nobody has heard), but I’ve realised that I should just keep making my music. It’s supposed to be fun.

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BWS: Sadly, I have never had to chance to visit the Netherlands.  The pictures I’ve seen of the geography are really astounding, though.  The amount of green in the countryside is magical.  The architecture of the cities is something to marvel over as well.  How much inspiration, if any, do you gather from your surroundings?

TMSV: I really like this country. There aren’t many exotic or amazing things to see nature-wise, but it’s never ugly. I like the cities as well, old Dutch architecture can be really beautiful, and luckily there are lots of old buildings that are still standing.

I guess I gather inspiration from the relative serenity of the area where I live. One of the best things about this place is that you can almost always escape from the chaos of modern city life. I live in a quiet neighborhood as well, and it’s a 15 minutes’ walk to the centre of the city, so if I want to see friends and have a drink, I can choose to leave my quiet house and go to the slightly more busy city. I think the fact that going out doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re jumping into a city full of chaos and noise is calming in a way.

BWS: Furthering on influences and inspiration, how did the track ‘Myth’ come about?  Hands down one of the best tunes that was released last year.  I listen to the tune almost everyday when I get off work and every time it sounds fresh.  Seriously, big up for that production.

TMSV: Thank you very much! It’s actually very reliant on samples, as you can hear from the lead sound. After using the sample(s) I made a bassline and a beat, added some atmospheres and other sounds, and that’s all there was to it, really. I have to say that the tune was already at least 2 years old when it was released, so I can’t really remember too much about how I made it.

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BWS: Do you see yourself going in any specific direction with your productions in 2012?

TMSV: Definitely. As I said, I’m focusing on making music right now. I’m trying to avoid being boring and predictable, to a certain extent of course. At the moment I’m making more than just 140 BPM music: I’m working on dub, house, garage, hip-hop, downtempo, all kinds of stuff.

BWS: What are your feelings on the 140 jungle tunes that have been getting hype lately?

TMSV: There’s definitely some great 140 jungle around at the moment, in fact I just got some today that sounded sick.

It seems to be difficult (for me as well as for other producers) to really ‘get it right’ and not sounding like a parody of the typical jungle sound. Jungle was never about quantising and getting your samples to sound just right; it was about the groove of the breaks you used, the simple but effective basslines and the vibes of the blatantly sampled sounds that were scattered around the tune. Modern music production software makes it much easier to make a really well-produced tune than the old samplers the jungle guys used to have, and I think nowadays you actually have to put effort into balancing a nice mixdown with getting an ‘authentic’ sound.

BWS: You have been collaborating with some really sick artists recently, like DJ Madd and June Miller.  Can we expect a lot more collaborations to come?

TMSV: Yes, definitely. I’m working with loads of people right now, but I’m not going to tell you who they are, because you never know if a collab is going to work or not.

I’m also looking for vocalists to work with me. I’ve had some responses already, but I’m always open to singers and MCs who would like to work with me. Please don’t hesitate to send me a message through Soundcloud or Facebook.

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BWS: What are your views on the US dubstep scene, as a whole?  Do you see yourself making it out this way anytime soon?

TMSV: Hopefully, yes. I’ve only been to the US once, about 9 years ago. I’d really love to visit again at some point. You can count on me flooding Facebook with spam when someone books me to come play in the US.

I don’t know much about your dubstep scene, but I do know that the deeper sound has gained popularity recently, which is great. It’s a huge country and very musically diverse, so I can’t see why the dubstep scene couldn’t be great.

BWS: If you could collaborate with any US based producer, who would it be, and why?

TMSV: When it comes to dubstep (and related genres), DJG (Grenier) or Matty G. Their tunes are very musical and diverse and the production is always sick, so collaborating with either of them would be cool. I’m probably missing ten thousand other American producers in my head right now. Sorry, you know how it is.

There are so many US based producers of other styles, it would be impossible to choose one or even ten. I do think I should name Dr. Dre and RZA just in case they Google themselves while looking for Dutch producers to work with.

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Serious amount of respect out to TMSV for doing this feature for us, it was truly an honor.  All the heads reading this that are new to his sounds, you’ve got a lot of catching up to do!  Be sure to stop by his Soundcloud and Facebook page and show him some love and support if you’re feeling his vibes.  You can find links to both below.

TMSV Facebook Page

TMSV Soundcloud Page

Alright people, that’s it for today.  Now I’m off to Coachella with the homie Lowkey to check out some very diverse musicians/bands out in Indio, CA.  Really stoked to see Machinedrum and Sbtrkt, among many many others.  Pretty stoked to see Sub Focus’s new “live” set as well.  Anyways, hope everybody has a great weekend filled with good vibes, good people, and good music.  One love.

To the gods.

-Kinman

Killawatt: Exclusive Bassweight Society Interview

What’s up everybody!  We’re back with our monthly interview.  Today, we get words from a man who has established his presence with insurmountable speed.  Killawatt, nominated for best new producer in the Dubstepforum Awards this past year, is on a path straight to the top.  Securing releases on labels such as Black Box/Box Clever, Boka, New Moon, Subway, and DubPride, Matt Watt’s sound has been gaining a really large amount of support from the likes of Youngsta, Thinking, and many more.  All of this action seen has been within less than TWO years!  That is not to say that Killawatt is new to the music scene, though.  He got his hands on his first pair of decks back in 03′, and quickly began to make a name for himself in the jungle scene.  Fast forward to 2010, he is now co-operator of jungle label, Satta Sounds, and continues to carry on that passion.  But, he also gained a strong love for deep, minimal dubstep music.  After gaining his first release on New Zealand imprint DubPride, Matt had decided to part ways with the dubwise tunes he had currently been producing.  After taking classes in soundscaping and sound design he became very infatuated with the appeal of the ambient and cinematic aspects of dubstep.  The rest is history.  Making his debut appearance on Rinse fm in July of 2011, Killawatt has been smashing dance floors with his hard hitting mixing style.   As he continues to build his signature sound he is beginning to slowly drift into a seperate realm of classification. By that I mean that he is pretty much in a category of his own.  On the late he has been fusing a lot of techno influences into his 140 productions and is creating some of the heaviest rollers out there right now.  HUGE rolling kick drums, techno stabs that can make a good girl turn bad, and some of the most well-executed use of bongos the past year has seen, and there has been A LOT of bongo use in the tunes this past year.  His ability to incorporate the multitude of percussive instruments that he does has been, without a doubt, unrivaled in 2011.  Just recently he has had releases on Boka and New Moon and will see one shortly on Wheel & Deal.

Let’s see what the man has to say about the complaints of so-called “purists”, 140 jungle, and who shot Biggie and Tupac.

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BWS:  Alright, let’s get the boring stuff out of the way first.  Can you give the readers a little background about yourself.
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Killawatt:  Ez, I’m Matt Watt aka Killawatt and i’m currently based in Southsea. I’ve been producing dubstep for around 2 years now, dabbled in making scatty ragga jungle before  but never really took producing seriously until i got into dubstep late 2009. 
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BWS:  The percussive elements in your music are unreal man.  This is an attribute of your music that caught my attention when I first heard your sounds, and it has kept me hooked ever since.  Sometimes, in my opinion, people get too carried away with the focus on sub-bass, leaving other elements of the tune sub-par.  The fact that you are able to recognize the importance of each element and then successfully harness that importance is one of the best things about your style.  Do you use a lot of sampling when building your music or do you play intruments live? Or both?
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Killawatt:  I use a hell of a lot of samples for pretty much all aspects of my music. I never really used to be into sampling, probably because i didn’t really know how to make good use of it, but recently it has taken hold of my productions, largely due to the influence of Ipman and renowned sample based producers such as Amon Tobin. Ipman works as a sound designer and sampling is obviously a major part of that so we’re always talking about it and thats influenced me a lot. It’s also because sampling and resampling opens up so many sonic possibilities. You can create sounds and textures that you could never recreate using purely synthesis, the organicism of real sounds provides an extra layer of depth that really lifts the music. I also like the unpredictability of using sounds i’ve recorded myself or that somebody else has, you don’t have complete control over all the parameters so i think it makes me work harder to achieve a sound i want.  I very rarely play live instruments in. I can play the trombone and the guitar and i have recently started using them in a couple of secret side projects i have on the go, its actually been quite inspiring playing them again so i think it is something i will do a lot more of. Over time i’d like to build up a collection of instruments, both common and obscure, so that i can make use of acoustic and electronic instruments equally.
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BWS:  Your turnover rate for tunes is extremely high.  Is production your only full-time job?  If yes, what did you do to accumulate all your studio equipment before beats were paying your bills?
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Killawatt:  Well, i suppose you’d have to call it my full-time job since i don’t have a job and i do it pretty much full-time. That does not mean, however, that it pays my bills! I’m sure i will start to earn a half decent living off it at some point but its hard work scraping the pennies together at the moment. Luckily my parents are very supportive of me so they are helping me get along for a few months until i start earning more from producing/DJing or until i get a job. I’m pretty lucky in that sense really!
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BWS:  As a fan myself, I have a very large respect for the appreciation that you express to your supporters.  Maybe not in a verbose manner necessarily, but in the tunes that you give out for free.  Usually it’s quite obvious why an artist is giving their particular tune(s) out for free; they were old, unfinished projects thrown together half-assedly at the very last moment.  Your free music, however, is of the same top-notch quality as the music you release on respected labels such as Black Box, Boka, and New Moon.  Is this something that you set out to do?
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Killawatt:  I love sharing my music, it gets me into a bit of trouble with my peers sometimes but i write so much music, and so much of it will never see the light of day unless i give it out for free. I don’t see the point of uploading everything i make to soundcloud if half of its never going to get released or played so i may as well give it out. I would never give out anything i haven’t played or know i wouldn’t play so i suppose thats why they are of that quality. The end of last year went a bit over the top with the free giveaways, literally everybody was doing it and to be brutally honest some of the music that got given away from pretty awful, was almost embarrassing.  I’ve already compiled 2 free EP’s ready to giveaway the promote releases this year so you have them to look forward to! 
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BWS:  Lately you have been making tunes that have a more techno vibe to them.  Can we expect 2012 to be filled with releases like these?
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Killawatt:  haha yes you can expect a LOT more like this. Techno is my main passion at the moment so it was always going to filter down into my own productions. I’m not really making your standard 128 4×4 techno, i’ve tried but i can never shrug off my dubstep production so it ends sounding a bit crap. I’ve gone back to the 140 bpm tempo and tried to incorporate aspects of techno into it and people seem to like it so i think i’ll keep making it! I can’t really make half-step anymore, since ive been producing this more upbeat and energetic style, half-step has just seemed a bit labarious and sluggish, theres just not enough energy in most of the stuff coming out whereas with these techno influenced rollers with the big relentless kick drum lines and the pounding subs there is just so much natural energy, you move instinctively to the music whether you like it or not because of the sheer physicality of it and the rhythms that have been engrained in us over the past millenia from ancient ‘tribal’ music. I say ‘tribal’ because there has been a recent trend in everything with one bongo in being tagged as tribal music, its utter rubbish and is something i find pretty annoying to be completely honest. I’ll stop ranting!  Expect to hear plenty more of this sound this year though, either at 140 or 134 bpm!
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BWS:  There has been a sufficient amount of hype surrounding the 140 jungle that is currently being pushed by artists like Arc88, Benton, Dismantle, etc.  What is your take on it?  Considering that you used to produce jungle/own Satta Sounds, do you see yourself putting out tunes of this vein?  Or have you already, and we just haven’t heard them yet?
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Killawatt:  I’m not a fan, although i was smashing Dismantles terrain EP, they’ve got that older jungle aesthetic but with very up to date production and most importantly sound massive through a system.  Again its one of these things where people run out of ideas so they hark back to an older style and then claim its new, most of the time anyway. The majority of it sounds pretty weak compared to actual jungle, with looped 4-bar breaks that have had basically no processing, or have been processed completely wrong. Jungle was well ahead of its time and this stuff just isn’t. The most authentic 140 jungle tune ive heard is Ipmans remix of my track ‘Sidewinder’ that was released on the Black Boxxx series in december, the man knows how to chop up a break or too! I suppose because of my background in jungle i will always have this view. I still love jungle and really miss playing it out, it’s so fun to mix, and a lot more challenging than dubstep in my opinion. I have tried a few times to make jungle again but the production values are so different to dubstep that i just can’t really do it anymore. I’m sure i’ll make it again someday but just not quite yet!  Big ups to the Satta Sounds crew, making big moves in the jungle scene this year!
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BWS:  There has been, among a select population, a growing discontentment for the current state of the genre.  These are typically the people who complain about dubstep not being “underground” enough anymore, or just plain “dead”.  I have a really hard time with those kind of claims, mainly due musicians like yourself, Compa, Phaeleh, Von D, and so many others.  Your sounds are fresh, forward-thinking, and exhibit uniquity, so how someone can claim that dubstep is dead is beyond me.  Where do you see yourself going with your music in the next year or so?  Do you have any insight on where the genre as a whole is heading?
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Killawatt:  Those people need to get a grip on life. This discontentment is something i find very irritating. There is so much good, new music being made and released but these people are either too lazy to go looking for, jumping on a bandwagon or are just bitter. I for one am really happy that dubstep has found the masses. Obviously the biggest crowd pullers are playing the more aggressive and obnoxious style of the sound but who says something isn’t allowed to evolve and adapt? Thats just what the majority are into and fair enough, if they have a good time listening or dancing to it then i don’t see how its a bad thing. Even if just 1% of the people who have discovered dubstep in the last year take the opportunity to delve deeper into the underground then that surely is a good thing? Without it going mainstream, J:Kenzo wouldn’t be doing his Daily Dose of Dubstep on Mistajams show and Skream & Benga would never had got their INDWT show and now their weekly friday night show. They have been representing both the mainstream and the underground consistently on 2 of the biggest radio stations in the country…how can that possibly be a negative thing?!  I honestly don’t have a clue where its all heading, and thats the most exciting thing about it. It will just keep mutating over time, giving birth to more and more different styles. I think dubstep has been a mini paradigm shift in music. Drum & Bass was too much of a clique to really do anything massively beneficial in genre development and house/techno/trance/garage had all gone a bit stale until dubstep came along. Now i think all the genres within EDM feed off each other and thats why there’s so much interesting music being made at the moment, even though a lot of people would say otherwise. Moreover, all genres within the whole of music feed off eachother now, not just EDM.  I see myself just doing what im doing now and hoping things go to plan!!
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BWS:  What should the readers be on the look out for, as far as releases from yourself, in the next few months?
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Killawatt:  January was a fairly hectic month with 4 releases coming out within 3 weeks of eachother. There’ll be a bit of a break now i think. Look out for my 2nd release on Wheel & Deal, my remix of Radikal Guru’s ‘Dread Commandments’ on Moonshine recordings alongside more Radikal Guru remixes by RSD, Hatti Vatti and Adam Prescott.  I have plenty more for the rest of this year already but thats all under wraps for now…there should be some news soon though so hold tight!
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BWS:  Alright, now, just for fun……
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BWS:  Who shot biggie and tupac?
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Killwatt:  MC Hammer
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BWS:  If you were stranded on an island and could only keep with you the following things, what would they be? 1 vinyl, 1 DAW, 1 piece of hardware, and 1 sandwich.
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Killawatt:  The vinyl would be Pink Floyds ‘Wish You Were Here’ – amazing album! Provokes pretty much all your emotions!  Don’t think i’d really be bothered about having a DAW if i was stranded on a desert island. Pretty useless really considering i wouldn’t have a computer!  My choice of hardware would be a solar powered fridge…pretty useful.  My sandwich would be cheese, ham, gherkins, mayonnaise and branstons pickle in homemade white bread! the king of sandwiches!
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BWS:  If you had the ability to make music with one person, dead or alive, who would it be? and what one question would you ask that person?
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Killawatt:  Would have to be Hendrix, he was just a straight up badman! I’d ask why he didn’t read the label on those sleeping pills!!
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BWS:  What would you consider to be the most ideal setting for your performances?  Who would you want to be there?
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Killawatt:  On a beach in the Maldives with my girlfriend, family, friends and all my favorite musicians! sounds like paradise to me!
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We just want to give a massive shout out to Killawatt for taking the time to answer these questions for us!  Respect.
Below you will find links to Killawatt’s Facebook, Soundcloud, and Myspace.  Make sure you check out his music if you haven’t been fortunate enough to yet.  Support the artists, BUY THEIR MUSIC!
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Thanks for reading everybody, make sure to watch this page as we have another great interview lined up for March!  Go ahead, start guessing ;).
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To the gods.
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-Bassweight Society (Kinman)

Atmospheric Vibez

Good day!

First at bat today is big dog Synkro coming at us with a recent release on Exit Records.  Many of you should know him by now, his tunes can be heard on labels such as Apollo, Exit, Autonomic, Med School, Warm Communications, Pushing Red, Blackout Music and Box Clever.  His skills as a producer are undeniable and his sense of producing atmospheric bass music is respected by music listeners across a multitude of genres.  Synkro recently put out a tune on Exit Records, as the 34th release for the label.  The tune we want to highlight here is called Progression.  I heard it at a show that Dbrige played at in LA a couple weeks back.  I like the way Synkro utilizes echoes to make the tune sound really deep and atmospheric.  This is a well suited tune for kicking back to on a week night.  Have a listen!

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Following the vibe of that last tune, here’s another chilled out one.  Skream released a clip last week of a tune he says will be released soon.  It’s only a short clip, but it was enough to get us excited to hear the full version.  Like the previous tune, this one has a spacey feel, almost like you’re about to float out of your skin.  Definitely a tune worthy of smoking a spliff to.  Kick back and enjoy.

Skream – Chitral

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This last tune comes from a producer named Kasket who we’ve never covered before.  He’s a British producer set to have a release out on Apollo records in the near future.  The tune we chose to highlight is called Life Goes On.  We wanted to keep the vibe steady, so as with the tunes above, this is a real chilled back one.  A long intro of fluctuating sounds is met with a nice drum pattern and steady vocal whisper.  Definitely a great tune for kicking back to and letting it take your mind somewhere nice.

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Be sure to check his soundcloud, there’s some free gems on there!

Kasket Soundcloud

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Hope that put you in a steady balance.  It’s good to have that bank of relaxing tunes to level things out.

Bless,

-BWS (Lowkey)